Snake show in Meridian snares children's attention

Paula Merritt / The Meridian Star

Rebecca Y. Tucker, owner/operator of the Yarbrough's Educational Reptiles, shows children and other guests a king snake during a show put on by the Meridian-Lauderdale County Library Thursday at the MSU Riley Center.

Meridian area children familiarized themselves with the reptiles of Yarbrough's Education Reptiles Snake Show on Thursday between shrieks of excitement and awestruck "wows." 

Snake show in Meridian snares children's attention

Paula Merritt / The Meridian Star

Maddie Prickett holds a albino python as children circle around to take turns petting the snake Thursday at the Yarbrough's Educational Reptiles show put on by the Meridian-Lauderdale County Library at the MSU Riley Center.

Becky Tucker, the "Snake Lady," displayed harmless and venomous snakes alike, teaching children about the habits of snakes as part of the Meridian-Lauderdale County Public Library event, which was held at the Mississippi State University Riley Center.

Snake show in Meridian snares children's attention

Paula Merritt / The Meridian Star

Rebecca Y. Tucker, owner/operator of the Yarbrough's Educational Reptiles, holds her alligator as children take turns petting it during a show put on by the Meridian-Lauderdale County Library at the MSU Riley Center Thursday afternoon.

 

"If you go into your shed and find a snake, why would a snake want to be there?" Yarbrough said. "He's found his favorite food – a rat or a mouse."

Yarbrough held up a non-venomous milk snake, frequently confused for the dangerous coral snake. Both are red, yellow and black but differ on the order of their colors. Milk snakes' red stripes touch their black stripes and not the yellow while the coral snakes' yellow stripes touch their red stripes.

"Just remember, if red's touching yellow, it'll kill a fellow," Yarbrough said, holding up the coral snake. "But if it's red touching black, it's a friendly jack."

Snake show in Meridian snares children's attention

Paula Merritt / The Meridian Star

Rebecca Y. Tucker, left, owner/operator of the Yarbrough's Educational Reptiles, and Maddie Prickett put an alligator to sleep during a show put on by the Meridian-Lauderdale County Library at the MSU Riley Center Thursday afternoon.

 

Yarbrough warned children not to ignore snakebites and seek medical attention as soon as possible. But, because of anti-venoms, only an average of five people die annually despite 8,000 snake bites per year.

"More people die by bee stings or wasp stings than snake bites," Yarbrough said.

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