To help raise awareness for Peripheral Artery Disease Awareness month, Cardiovascular Institute of the South will host a free screening event and lobby display at their location, 4909 Great River Dr. from 5:30-7:30 p.m., on Sept. 19.

According to a CIS press release, more than 20 million Americans suffer from peripheral artery disease, also known as PAD. This is a common circulatory problem in which narrowed arteries reduce blood flow to the limbs, leading to potential blockages in the legs.

With proper diagnosis and treatment, most patients can manage the symptoms of PAD and avoid amputation or heart attacks.

Symptoms of PAD to look for in the legs include pain or cramping after activity, numbness, coldness, sores or ulcers that won’t heal, discoloration, hair loss, shiny skin or a weak pulse.

The risk for developing PAD increases with age and is highest for those over 50 years old. Smoking increases the chance of developing PAD three to five times. But other common risk factors include diabetes, high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol levels, and a family history of vascular disease, heart attack or stroke.

There are several treatment options for those with PAD that can help patients reclaim their quality of life. Lifestyle adjustments, such as quitting smoking and eating healthier, or medications, can be effective for many people with PAD. In severe cases, minimally-invasive vascular surgery or bypass surgery may be necessary to restore blood flow to the limbs to prevent an amputation. CIS uses the latest technology and advancements in the treatment of PAD and believes that early detection and treatment can save limbs and lives.

If you think you may have PAD, a painless ultrasound or imaging test can show the blood flow in your legs to determine your risk.

Registration is encouraged for these screenings. To sign up, visit https://www.cardio.com/event-calendar or call Cardiovascular Institute of the South Meridian, 601-282-8980.

To learn more about peripheral artery disease, visit cardio.com/peripheral-artery-disease.

 

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