Meridian Star

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July 28, 2013

Picayune plant used creosote to treat lumber

Superfund site nearing completion

(Continued)

MERIDIAN —

Chemical oxidation will be used to remove ground water contamination from the most polluted areas and biological treatment, similar to sewage treatment, will be used in the less contaminated areas, said Taylor.

The surface soil contamination is maintained by the EPA for one year, after that, maintenance will be turned over to the state, said Taylor.

"We maintain the groundwater for 10 years, then hand it over (to the state)," he said.

Ninety-percent of the project is funded by the EPA and 10-percent is paid for by the state.

In the future, restrictions will apply to building on the site that is now zoned as open space.

"Institutional controls will prohibit residential development and limit the types of construction permitted on the cells," Taylor said.

Another restriction placed on the site includes receiving EPA and state approval to ever penetrate the concrete slabs that currently serve as additional soil-containment caps.

Superfund redevelopment and planning for the future of the site is the next center of focus.

"When getting near the completion of a project, it's the perfect time to bring stakeholders together to discuss what they want to do with the project," EPA Environmental Specialist Kyle Bryant said.

The property is currently owned by the state and is expected to be given to the city of Picayune.

In June, Bryant met with city officials and a grant coordinator. They solicited ideas from the EPA on different federal agency funding mechanisms, said Bryant.

"We're at the stage of the project where it's about cleaning it up and making it viable," Bryant said. "This is a way to reinvent the city and making this site the focal point."

Taylor has been talking to both the city and the state on the reuse of the site and says he could see something being put on the property for city use in 2014.

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