Meridian Star

Editorials

January 26, 2014

Editorial: Adding lights to high-crime areas makes sense

MERIDIAN — The city of Meridian and Mississippi Power are partnering to shed light on dark areas of the city.

At the request of Mayor Percy Bland and the Meridian City Council, the power company has added more than 50 new street lights.

In addition, Mississippi Power has inspected each of the 6,600 street lights in Meridian and "changed out every bulb, every photocell," said Eddie Kelly, Meridian division manager for Mississippi Power.

The power company owns the poles and lights and the city pays Mississippi Power for their use. The cost of paying for the street lights from Nov. 22 through Dec. 26, 2013 was nearly $80,000.

"A well-lit city is going to be a safer city and a better city," Bland said. "That's one of the costs of having a clean, well-lit, safe city."

We agree. The money is well spent.

Bland said the push to add more street lights and ensure that those already in place are working properly is part of the city's effort to reduce crime.

According to a report by the Community Oriented Police Services division of the U.S. Department of Justice titled "Improving Street Lighting to Reduce Crime in Residential Areas" by Ronald V. Clarke, adding street lighting can reduce crimes not only at night but during the day as well.

According to the report, installation of new lighting in poor lit areas indicates that local officials and police are serious about crime; increases community pride and the willingness to report criminals and aids in the arrest of those committing crimes, which all reduce crime both day and night.

At night, improved lighting discourages criminals from committing crimes and encourages residents to spend more time outside where they can better keep an eye on what is happening in their community, according to the report.

Text Only
Editorials
Biz Marquee
New Today
Poll

Do you think the city of Meridian should aggressively enforce the city's code enforcement laws on litter, abandoned homes and overgrown lots by issuing tickets and stiff fines?

Yes
No
     View Results
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter Updates
Follow us on twitter
AP Video
Netanyahu Vows to Destroy Hamas Tunnels Obama Slams Republicans Over Lawsuit House Leaders Trade Blame for Inaction Malaysian PM: Stop Fighting in Ukraine Cantor Warns of Instability, Terror in Farewell Ravens' Ray Rice: 'I Made a Huge Mistake' Florida Panther Rebound Upsets Ranchers Small Plane Crash in San Diego Parking Lot Busy Franco's Not Afraid of Overexposure Fighting Blocks Access to Ukraine Crash Site Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida Workers Dig for Survivors After India Landslide Texas Scientists Study Ebola Virus Smartphone Powered Paper Plane Debuts at Airshow Southern Accent Reduction Class Cancelled in TN
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide