Meridian Star

Community News Network

May 21, 2013

Where to get the best deal on beer, haircuts, movies

Looking for a good deal on a six-pack of beer? Try Charlotte. A haircut that won't burn a hole in your wallet? Harlingen, Texas, is your best bet. A trip to the movies? Hilo, Hawaii, is supposed to be nice this time of year.

That's according to the latest cost-of-living index, released last week by the Council for Community and Economic Research, which takes into account the average price of everything from a bottle of shampoo to a mortgage in more than 300 urban areas.

The areas ranked as the most expensive places to live in the first quarter included most of the usual suspects, with New York's Manhattan and Brooklyn boroughs taking the top two slots on the list. And for the third year in a row, Washington snagged a spot in the top 10, driven by the region's high-priced housing market and relative immunity from the economic downturn.

"Since the beginning of the Great Recession, Washington has catapulted itself into the top 10 based on the housing market," said Dean Frutiger, project manager for the Cost of Living Index at the council. Washington, which took ninth place in the first quarter, had traditionally remained just shy of the top 10 high-cost urban areas, often swapping places with Boston, Frutiger said.

Overall, the Washington area was about 42 percent more expensive compared with the national average.

Housing in the region was more than twice as expensive as in the rest of the country. Groceries were about 13 percent more expensive, while health care was 1.6 percent more expensive. The region's cost of living dropped slightly from the same time last year but was higher than in 2011.

For the third consecutive year, the city with the lowest cost of living was Harlingen, Texas. On average, a haircut there costs $7.38, compared with $16.17 in Washington. A movie ticket in Hilo will set you back only $5.68. In Manhattan, it's $13.50.

Text Only
Community News Network
Biz Marquee
New Today
Poll

A new law in Mississippi will require welfare recipients to undergo drug testing if their answers on a questionnaire indicate possible drug abuse. Do you like or dislike the new law?

Like
Dislike
     View Results
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter Updates
Follow us on twitter
AP Video
Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-free Travel Raw: MH17 Bodies Arrive in Netherlands Raw: Fight Breaks Out in Ukraine Parliament Disabled Veterans Memorial Nearing Completion Last Mass Lynching in U.S. Remains Unsolved Home-sharing Programs Help Seniors Ex-NYC Mayor: US Should Allow Flights to Israel Clinton: "AIDS-Free Generation Within Our Reach" Judge Ponders Overturning Colo. Gay Marriage Ban Airlines Halt Travel to Israel Amid Violence VA Nominee McDonald Goes Before Congress US Official: Most Migrant Children to Be Removed Police Probing Brooklyn Bridge Flag Switch CDC Head Concerned About a Post-antibiotic Era Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law Raw: Truck, Train Crash Leads to Fireball
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide